A Diagnosis, Afib, & a Birthday, Alas, Life Goes On

Looking South from Port Orford (Harbor? Cove?).  Highway 101 is in the background.
Looking South from Port Orford (Harbor? Cove?). Highway 101 is in the background.

More photos will be available in the ‘gallery’ under the ‘photography’ link in the menu. From there just click “Photography 2019”

This past week has been very, very busy. On the 18th, I saw my cardiologist who looked at my MRI Scan of my heart results and declared that I probably have not had a heart attack or else my ejection rate would not be back at a normal rate (with help of medications). I now own NO dead heart muscle and I am allowed to do anything I want/can physically. So my main goal is to work my health back up to as good as it can be. I found it interesting that he did not even change my medications, though I have the beginnings of Cardiac Artery Disease (CAD). I guess I am not far enough in for the change he thought I might have needed in an earlier appointment. This is all GREAT news!!!

Two days later, as if on cue, my husband said,”Honey, I think I need to go to the hospital.”His chest hurt mildly, and he did his home EKG and found that the pattern matched the picture that the cardiologist (same as mine, Dr. Fred VanDis, Roseburg –we both highly recommend him, get there before he retires!) drew for him so he’d know what Afib looked like. So, I drove him to the hospital around 6:30ish. The intake crew immediately confirmed Afib. Blood was drawn pretty quickly. And in the long run, it came back normal. So there was no heart attack in the making, just Afib. Now, don’t think that I am taking Afib lightly, I am very aware that it can cause life-ending blood clots that lead to stroke. In those moments, I was pretty damn scared, but, you know, you have to be strong for the one actually going through the actual problem. Of course, he was very full of humor. If he was scared, he sure wasn’t letting on.

He got his very first ever, shock. You know, you see it on TV, with the paddles and all. It was determined that he’d caught the Afib and got himself into the emergency room fast enough that shocking the heart was actually an option. If he’d been in Afib for days (as he was the first time) then a shock to the heart is out of the question because there is a good chance that a blood clot has formed and a shock could help it circulate through the system and create a stroke. He consented and signed his life away. The crew knocked him out, and the crew noted how ‘entertaining’ he was while he was on the way out. Then they shocked him.

We started our Tuesday which was my birthday this year in our usual way.  We went to the casino and he played his $10 free play and then we enjoyed his free ice cream cone.  Thank you 7 Feathers Casino for supporting your local veterans.  It makes for a fun outing away from the house, and the stresses of family.  
Tulips in Canyonville, Douglas County, Oregon.
We started our Tuesday which was my birthday this year in our usual way. We went to the casino and he played his $10 free play and then we enjoyed his free ice cream cone. Thank you 7 Feathers Casino for supporting your local veterans. It makes for a fun outing away from the house, and the stresses of family.
Tulips in Canyonville, Douglas County, Oregon.

In the meantime, I very willingly, stepped out as asked. I do believe that would have been too hard for me to watch in all honesty. I got to the waiting room. I used the girls’ room, and I played one game of solitaire. Then Kyle (part of the intake crew, and expert blood drawer) came out to get me and let me know they were done, and that it was a success.
They then began to let him know that as he was able he’d be ready to go home. He was still somewhat groggy. But, his heart tried to go into Afib again, so they decided he had to stay and be watched for 30 more minutes after he was given metoprolol in his IV. Probably an hour later, after his heart had finally settled down for a full 30 minutes, he got to go home. We were home and in by 3:35 am.

While there…we talked about what might have triggered the Afib, as apparently it can be triggered by outside things like stress, exercise, etc. We decided it was probably the physical stress of taking out a mature butterfly bush. Our oldest bush, at least 10 years old, was showing signs of considerable decay— aka rot! He was able to just push branches off with his foot. But, that was foot, leg muscles (the strongest in the body) and quite a bit of effort. OF course, there is also the underlying stress of his bankruptcy. But, we think ultimately, it was the butterfly bush.

Curlews in the surf. Port Orford, Oregon

But, you know the very next morning (er, same morning) we were both up doing what we had to do. He fixed our push weed wacker and started the lawn mower for me. I finished the front yard, and he started working on the very back which was knee deep in grass and weeds. I pushed the lawn mower to the place that I was afraid I was too weak to do, and the truth is I had to stop once and just breathe. I am not as strong as I was, but I can see now that as long as I have my medications (until my heart gets stronger) that I should be able to do whatever I did before. Good news!! And he got all of the inside of the back yard done. What he did was really no big deal back in the old days, but now, knowing that I didn’t even want him out there, well, I was happy he made it and did not go into AFib. He’s been told he can no longer participate in strenuous exercise. Of course, the joke is…what in the world will you do when sex becomes strenuous. His answer is that he’s going to die a very happy man. LOL

Battle Rock @ Port Orford, Douglas County, Oregon.  
During the Rogue Indian Wars a battle between natives and pioneers happened here. 
 I'll write about that soon.
Battle Rock @ Port Orford, Douglas County, Oregon.
During the Rogue Indian Wars a battle between natives and pioneers happened here.
I’ll write about that soon.

And two days after this round of Afib, and getting put to sleep, and then being shocked to reset the heart’s electrical signal, it was my 57th birthday. He offered me a day trip, which I gratefully accepted. We made a huge circle. And made it to the Oregon coast. He drove the whole way and never once even looked tired. He’s an amazing man. And though, I know he was not trying to prove anything, on our trip, we stopped in Port Orford at Battle Rock to walk on the beach. The man can’t see a rock that he isn’t trying to climb them. Up and over he went, two days after an episode of Afib. Indeed, life goes on…

Textures in the sand.  Of course, the metaphor of the footprints come to mind and never escapes me, hence the photo.  But, the ripples caused by the wind, and the crust of dry sand broken and lying atop the rest all interested me.  It's all beautiful to me.
Textures in the sand. Of course, the metaphor of the footprints come to mind and never escapes me, hence the photo. But, the ripples caused by the wind, and the crust of dry sand broken and lying atop the rest all interested me. It’s all beautiful to me.

Note All images copyright April 23, 2019, Peggy A. Rowe-Snyder. Do not use without prior written permission. These and other High-Resolution shots from this day are available for purchase.

Sea Scoters on the surf in Port Orford, Oregon.  These are fun and large sea ducks.  They went behind the curl of an incoming wave and then would dive.  I'd be trying to get a photo and oooppps, they were gone!  I have a whole lot of photos with no birds in them.  Once the popped back up, they rode the surf in partway, and fairly close to dry land, then they'd swim back out behind a curl of a wave and go again!  They were fun to hunt (for photos)
Sea Scoters on the surf in Port Orford, Oregon. These are fun and large sea ducks. They went behind the curl of an incoming wave and then would dive. I’d be trying to get a photo and oooppps, they were gone! I have a whole lot of photos with no birds in them. Once the popped back up, they rode the surf in partway, and fairly close to dry land, then they’d swim back out behind a curl of a wave and go again!
They were fun to hunt (for photos)






About PeggyAnn

Professional PC Consultant, Researcher, & avid people watcher, Peggy Ann Rowe started into her genealogical quest at age 15 after watching the mini-series, "Roots" with her parents. This new obsession has fueled her love of history, & study of cultures & societies in every epoch. Today she is 57 years old with four kids who are all grown up (& all have flown the coop). In between her 'gigs' with clients she volunteered at many different non-profits. Former President, Secretary, and Director at Large on the board of the Douglas County Historical Society for 10+ years, and former Secretary at the Cloverdale Historical Society (Sonoma County) for nearly 10 years. This website is an attempt to share the knowledge she has gained about her family ties with others who may be interested in the same things. She does not guarantee 100% accuracy and does hope that you will send corrections. To learn more about her, click the "about" button in the page menu. Thanks! Another goal of this website is to disseminate a message (i.e. education) about domestic violence, child abuse, and all forms of sexual abuse to society at large. The message comes from real experience from the whole spectrum of the violence from sexual abuse by a perpetrator to sexual abuse perpetrated by a husband, to the abuse of children within the family. Peggy has seen it, lived it, and been hurt by it. There will on occasion be details that might be hard for some people to read, and a warning is usually posted at the beginning of the essay so that those who want to turn and not read may do so. The only way to teach and to let others learn what to avoid is to SHARE what happened with every detail necessary to make the point. Thank you.
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